Photography 101: Landmark

Landmarks are everywhere: iconic places, meeting points, markers on a map. Today, consider a unique point of view as you photograph a landmark.

We often use locations to orient us, to identify where we are — from statues to town squares to corner shops. These landmarks on a map can be famous and instantly recognizable, or sometimes they’re simple markers to help us navigate.

These images were actually taken 11 months ago with my mobile phone (Samsung Galaxy S3) while visiting Japan .

Tokyo Skytree (東京スカイツリー Tōkyō Sukaitsurī?) is a broadcasting, restaurant, and observation tower in Sumida, Tokyo, Japan. It became the tallest structure in Japan in 2010 and reached its full height of 634.0 metres (2,080 ft) in March 2011, making it the tallest tower in the world, displacing the Canton Tower, and the second tallest structure in the world after Burj Khalifa (829.8 m/2,722 ft). (Wikipedia)
TOKYO SKYTREE (東京スカイツリー Tōkyō Sukaitsurī?) is a broadcasting, restaurant, and observation tower in Sumida, Tokyo, Japan. It became the tallest structure in Japan in 2010 and reached its full height of 634.0 metres (2,080 ft) in March 2011, making it the tallest tower in the world, displacing the Canton Tower, and the second tallest structure in the world after Burj Khalifa (829.8 m/2,722 ft).
The tower is the primary television and radio broadcast site for the Kantō region; the older Tokyo Tower no longer gives complete digital terrestrial television broadcasting coverage because it is surrounded by high-rise buildings. Skytree was completed on 29 February 2012, with the tower opening to the public on 22 May 2012.[6] The tower is the centrepiece of a large commercial development funded by Tobu Railway and a group of six terrestrial broadcasters headed by NHK. Trains stop at the adjacent Tokyo Skytree Station and nearby Oshiage Station, and the complex is only 7 km (4.3 mi) north-east of Tokyo Station. (Wikipedia)
Tokyo Skytree
NAMING and HEIGHT
From October to November 2007, suggestions were collected from the general public for the name to be given to the tower. On 19 March 2008, a committee chose six final candidate names: Tōkyō Sukaitsurī (東京スカイツリー?, “Tokyo sky tree”), Tōkyō Edo Tawā (東京EDOタワー?, “Tokyo Edo tower”), Raijingu Tawā (ライジングタワー?, “Rising tower”), Mirai Tawā (みらいタワー?, “Tower of the future”), Yumemi Yagura (ゆめみやぐら?, “Dream lookout”), Raijingu Īsuto Tawā (ライジングイーストタワー?, “Rising east tower”). The official name was decided in a nationwide vote, and was announced on 10 June 2008 as “Tokyo Skytree”. The name received around 33,000 votes (30%) out of 110,000 cast, with the second most popular name being “Tokyo Edo Tower”. Since the name was decided in Japanese, which has no spaces between words, it is not possible to say whether it was intended to be “Tokyo Skytree” or “Tokyo Sky Tree”. The official website states “TOKYO SKYTREE” (all caps) as a registered trademark in English, but the version in the logo is clearly “SKY TREE”. English-language publications are divided between the two versions. The height of 634 m (2,080 ft) was selected to be easily remembered. The figures 6 (mu), 3 (sa), 4 (shi) stand for “Musashi”, an old name of the region where the Tokyo Skytree stands. (Wikipedia)
Design  The design was published on 24 November 2006, based on the following three concepts: Fusion of neofuturistic design and the traditional beauty of Japan, Catalyst for revitalization of the city, Contribution to disaster prevention – "Safety and Security". The base of the tower has a structure similar to a tripod; from a height of about 350 m (1,150 ft) and above, the tower's structure is cylindrical to offer panoramic views of the river and the city.[10] There are observatories at 350 m (1,150 ft), with a capacity of up to 2000 people, and 450 m (1,480 ft), with a capacity of 900 people.[11] The upper observatory features a spiral, glass-covered skywalk in which visitors ascend the last 5 meters to the highest point at the upper platform. A section of glass flooring gives visitors a direct downward view of the streets below. Earthquake resistance[edit] The tower has seismic proofing, including a central shaft made of reinforced concrete. The main internal pillar is attached to the outer tower structure 125 meters (410 ft) above ground. From there until 375 meters (1,230 ft) the pillar is attached to the tower frame with oil dampers, which act as cushions during an earthquake. According to the designers, the dampers can absorb 50 percent of the energy from an earthquake. Colour[edit] The exterior lattice is painted a colour officially called "Skytree White". This is an original colour based on a bluish white traditional Japanese colour called aijiro (藍白?). Illumination[edit] The illumination design was published on 16 October 2009. Two illumination patterns Iki (chic, stylish) sky blue and Miyabi (elegance, refinement) purple will be used, alternating daily. The tower is illuminated using LED lights. (Wikipedia)
DESIGN
The design was published on 24 November 2006, based on the following three concepts:
– Fusion of neofuturistic design and the traditional beauty of Japan,
– Catalyst for revitalization of the city,
– Contribution to disaster prevention – “Safety and Security”.
The base of the tower has a structure similar to a tripod; from a height of about 350 m (1,150 ft) and above, the tower’s structure is cylindrical to offer panoramic views of the river and the city.[10] There are observatories at 350 m (1,150 ft), with a capacity of up to 2000 people, and 450 m (1,480 ft), with a capacity of 900 people. The upper observatory features a spiral, glass-covered skywalk in which visitors ascend the last 5 meters to the highest point at the upper platform. A section of glass flooring gives visitors a direct downward view of the streets below.
EARTHQUAKE RESISTANCE
The tower has seismic proofing, including a central shaft made of reinforced concrete. The main internal pillar is attached to the outer tower structure 125 meters (410 ft) above ground. From there until 375 meters (1,230 ft) the pillar is attached to the tower frame with oil dampers, which act as cushions during an earthquake. According to the designers, the dampers can absorb 50 percent of the energy from an earthquake.
COLOUR
The exterior lattice is painted a colour officially called “Skytree White”. This is an original colour based on a bluish white traditional Japanese colour called aijiro (藍白).
ILLUMINATION
The illumination design was published on 16 October 2009. Two illumination patterns Iki (chic, stylish) sky blue and Miyabi (elegance, refinement) purple will be used, alternating daily. The tower is illuminated using LED lights. (Wikipedia)
I will share more about my fun experience at Tokyo Skytree in my upcoming post. :)
I will share more about my fun experience at Tokyo Skytree in my upcoming post. 🙂

6 thoughts on “Photography 101: Landmark

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s